Executive Disorder: Mapping the US ban on Chinese stocks

Last November, the Trump administration announced a ban on US investors holding Chinese stocks with suspected military links. Despite some big names falling on the US government’s blacklist, the contribution from banned stocks total less than 3% of the overall weight in the average China investor’s portfolio.

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Value, Growth and Bubbles: A Comparison Between China and US Markets

The value-growth cycle is a hot debate of late. As it should be. So is talk of bubbles. Research Affiliates co-founder Rob Arnott continues to sagely prophesize value’s return. Here’s Rayliant’s take on where we are in that cycle with respect to the China equities market. We also contrast it with the journey that the US stock market has been on over the last 10 years.

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Should Investors Allocate More to China A Shares?

Despite the staggering size and growth of China’s economy, Chinese stocks occupy a surprisingly small place in most investors’ portfolios. Dr. Phil Wool takes an evidence-based look at common arguments for and against a greater allocation to the world’s second-largest stock market.

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Where Retail Rules: Buying Into China’s Alpha Opportunity

Even before the recent trade war, the U.S. president had a hand in China’s market, by way of “concept” stocks. They are just one of the quirks found in retail heavy emerging markets like China, whose inefficiencies—and alpha opportunity—are traced to non-professionals trading as much for entertainment as for profit. In the research below, we investigate the evolution of retail participation in China A shares, the remarkable inefficiencies that creates, and the implications for professional investors.

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ESG in Need: Beyond the ‘Good Karma’ Lens

ESG investing has become more in vogue in the past five years. Part of this may be driven by an on-faith belief, supported by shallow anecdotal evidence, that investing in ethical companies (high ESG companies) must lead to better investment outcome. You could call this belief the “good karma” principal in investing.

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